ROBERT LESLIE FIELDING
Be kind to everyone you meet.
You may never see them again.

Write to be read - be better than you need to be!

 

 

Critical reflection

How to deepen learning through critical reflection

Too many students simply acquire pieces of knowledge without establishing 

relationships among them,

 integrating new information 

with prior learning, or grappling with big questions. Critical reflection can 

engage students in learning that 

challenges their assumptions 

and deepens the way they understand issues and concepts.

A college education is about more than just accumulating knowledge. 

To reach deeper levels of understanding,

 a student must be able to construct meaning out of a purposeful combination of experiences 

and academic materials. All too often, however, academic depth is sacrificed to breadth. 

When the main learning goal is to cover as much material in a semester as possible, 

it’s not surprising that profound critical thinking goals tends to be glossed 

over in favor of more superficial learning objectives. Critical reflection is one of the best 

ways to overcome this common problem. When intentionally and carefully 

designed, critical reflection activities motivate students to “dig deep” and engage in the 

intensive process of analyzing, reconsidering, and questioning academic experiences 

and content knowledge. 

http://www.facultyfocus.com/seminars/how-to-deepen-learning-through-critical-reflection/

 

Three ways to help students become more meta-cognitively aware

Encourage students to express their confusion in class

Incorporating reflection into graded coursework

Faculty modeling - thinking out loud in front of students

Activity in and of itself does not promote learning. Activity must be accompanied by a 

metacognitive component, which requires students to 

process what they are doing, why they are doing it, and what they are learning from doing it.

Reference:
Tanner, K. D. 2012. “Promoting Student Metacognition.” 

Cell Biology Education—Life Sciences Education, 11 (Summer): 113–120.

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/three-ways-to-help-students-become-more-metacognitively-aware/