ROBERT LESLIE FIELDING
Be kind to everyone you meet.
You may never see them again.

Write to be read - be better than you need to be!

 

 

The meaning of ‘knowing’ has shifted from being able to remember 

and repeat information to being able to find and use it.” 
(National Research Council, 2007)

What did you do at school today?

by

Robert L. Fielding

Every Friday, I go to Nan’s house for dinner until Mum gets back from her work to pick me up.  

Grandpa opens the door and gives me the same question as I take my coat off and drink some 

juice Nan pours for me.

 “What did you do at school today, John?” he says, which I think is odd because as it’s 

Friday, the answer is always the same.

 “Maths, English, Sport and Geography, Gramps!”  I drink the juice and get my 

ipad out of my schoolbag.

  “So you know your capitals, do you?” says Gramps.

  “Capitals?” I ask.

  “Aye, lad, capitals - capitals of countries!”

  “No, Gramps, I don’t know them.”  My Grandad looked at me, 

then he looked at Nan.

  “I don’t know what they teach them these days,” he said, sort of to 

both of us.  Nan nodded to him and shook her head to me.  She had 

heard it all before.

  “Do you know the capital city of Turkey?” he asked me.  I told him 

I didn’t.  He frowned at me and then beamed.

  “Ankara,” he said, “the capital city of Turkey is Ankara!”

  “Is it, Gramps?”  He beamed and frowned again.

  “Aye, lad,” he said, “it is!”  It was my turn to frown.

  “How do you know that, Gramps?”  I was always a curious kid.

  “Geography, of course,” he said, “I’ve always wanted to go to Ankara.”

  “Why?” was my question.  He frowned some more.

  “To see Ataturk’s Mausoleum,” he said.  More curiosity.

  “What’s that?” I asked.  He looked exasperated.

  “What is it they teach you at that school?”  More frowning.

  “Everything,” was my unexpected reply.

He shook his head as Nan brought in our food.  We ate in a sort 

of silence - quiet from me and talking from him and my Nan.  Finally, 

I asked him one more question.

  “Why don’t you go then, if you want to?”  I knew they had some 

money, and of course, they had lots and lots of time.  He shook his 

head again.

  “Kids,” he said, “what are they like?”  It was a question that didn’t 

need an answer.

-00000-

While they listened to the News on TV, I went online on my ipad. 

 I had a small printer permanently at their house, so I connected and printed.

  “What’s this?” Gramps asked me as I handed him the piece of paper I’d printed out.

  “It’s an e-ticket, Gramps,” I told him and waited for the explosion.

He looked at it and then he exploded.

  “This is a plane ticket to Ankara,” he said.

  “Go to the top of the class,” I thought but didn’t say it out loud.

  “What are we supposed to do with this?” they both asked me.

  “Fly!” I answered, laughing.

  “And what’ll we do when we get there?” asked Nan.  

The printer was still printing.

  “Stay at this hotel,” I said and handed him the voucher I’d printed 

out for them.  Still the printer ran on.

  “Here’s your itinerary,” I said and handed them another shock.  

Right there on the first day of their stay in Ankara was a visit to 

Ataturk’s Mausoleum - Anitkabir, in Turkish.

  “It’s open from 9am until 5pm,” I said, “and it’s free to get in!”  

They both looked sooo amazed at me, at the e-ticket, the voucher 

and the itinerary.

  “Have a nice time in Ankara,” I said, “which, by the way, was 

called Angora before it became Ataturk’s new capital city!”

  “Well,” said Nan, “you learn something new every day!”

Robert L. Fielding

  

 

 

Inquiry based learning

“It is not enough to merely gather information.  If the individual is to understand it and learn from it, there is an essential, interpretive task.”

Jerome Bruner, Psychologist

“Through the process of inquiry, individuals construct much of their understanding of the natural and human-designed worlds.” 

www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/ 

Long Bay Primary School

http://www.longbayprimary.ac.nz/teachingandlearing_inquirybased_learning.html

Heatherhill Primary School

http://www.heatherhillps.vic.edu.au/inquiry.html

Alberta Education

http://education.alberta.ca/teachers/aisi/themes/inquiry.aspx

Cotswold School

http://www.cotswold.school.nz/WebSpace/269/

Skagerak School, Norway

http://www.skagerak.org/page.cfm?p=491

Yokohama School

http://www.yis.ac.jp/page.cfm?p=807

Newcastle University

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/cflat/Enquirybasedlearning.htm

Introduction to Inquiry based learning

http://www.teachinquiry.com/index/Introduction.html

IBL

http://www.neiu.edu/~middle/Modules/science%20mods/amazon%20components/AmazonComponents2.html

Manchester University

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/ebl/

MU Centre for excellence in EBL

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/

Resources and case studies

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/casestudies/

Guides

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/guides/

Technical guides

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/technicalguides/

Primary resources

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/primaryresources/

Dissemination

http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/dissemination/

How to assess EBL (Glasgow University)

http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/learningteaching/goodpracticeresources/enquirybasedlearning/enquirybasedlearningeblproject/howtoassessebl/

What is inquiry based learning?

http://www.thinkinginmind.com/2011/08/what-is-inquiry-based-learning/

Teach Thought - guide for teachers

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/4-phases-inquiry-based-learning-guide-teachers/

 

 

Inquiry based learning

Listen while you work - Rachmaninov’s finest!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsFbah-NbME

Tchaikovsky - best of

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_WWz2DSnT8

1 hr 54 mins of relaxation music by Chopin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oy6NvWeVruY

Inquiry-based learning (also enquiry-based learning in British English)[1] starts by posing 

questions, problems or scenarios -- rather than simply presenting established facts or 

portraying a smooth path to knowledge.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquiry-based_learning

In general, the traditional approach to learning is focused on mastery of content, with

 less emphasis on the development of skills and the nurturing of inquiring attitudes.

The current system of education is teacher centered, with the teacher focused on giving 

out information about "what is known." Students are the receivers of information, and the

 teacher is the dispenser. Much of the assessment of the learner is focused on the 

importance of "one right answer." Traditional education is more concerned with

 preparation for the next grade level and in-school success than with helping a

 student learn to learn throughout life. 

The system is more student centered, with the teacher as a facilitator of learning. 

There is more emphasis on "how we come to know" and less on "what we know."

 Students are more involved in the construction of knowledge through active involvement. 

Inquiry learning is concerned with in-school success, but it is equally concerned with 

preparation for life-long learning. 

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/index_sub1.html

Habits of mind are nurtured through questioning and reflection. 

Questions, whether self-initiated or "owned," are at the heart of inquiry learning.

 STUDENTS DOING INQUIRY LEARNING 

characteristics of students in inquiry learning ****

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/index_sub2.html

Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today's world. 

Facts change, and information is readily available -- what's needed is an 

understanding of how to get and make sense of the mass of data.

Inquiry is not so much seeking the right answer -- because often there is none --

 but rather seeking appropriate resolutions to questions and issues.

Content of disciplines is very important, but as a means to an end, not as an end in

 itself. The knowledge base for disciplines is constantly expanding and changing. 

No one can ever learn everything, but everyone can better develop their skills and 

nurture the inquiring attitudes necessary to continue the generation and examination

 of knowledge throughout their lives.

trying to transmit "what we know," even if it were possible, is counterproductive in

 the long run.

Habits of mind vary in their rigidity across disciplines. This doesn't mean that one is

 right and the other is wrong, but simply that the "ground rules" are different. 

Individuals need many perspectives for viewing the world. Such views could include

 artistic, scientific, historic, economic, and other perspectives. 

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/index.html

One of the important missing pieces in many modern schools is a coherent and 

simplified process for increasing knowledge of a subject from lower grades to 

upper grades.

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/index_sub3.html

In 1961, the Educational Policies Commission published a position paper on the

 central purpose of American Education. The commission suggested that students

 needed to develop "ten rational powers." These were: recalling and imagining; 

classifying and generalizing; comparing and evaluating; analyzing and synthesizing; 

and deducing and inferring. These are also some of the fundamentals of inquiry learning. 

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/index_sub4.html

Education cannot give learners all the information that they need to know, 

but rather it must provide the tools for continuing to learn.

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/index_sub6.html

Constructivism says that people construct their own understanding and knowledge

 of the world, through experiencing things and reflecting on those experiences.

When we encounter something new, we have to reconcile it with our previous ideas

 and experience, maybe changing what we believe, or maybe discarding the new 

information as irrelevant. In any case, we are active creators of our own knowledge. 

To do this, we must ask questions, explore, and assess what we know. 

Constructivist teachers help students to construct knowledge rather than to 

reproduce a series of facts.

Constructivism transforms the student from a passive recipient of information 

to an active participant in the learning process.

Always guided by the teacher, students construct their knowledge actively

 rather than just mechanically ingesting knowledge from the teacher or the textbook.

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/index.html

Benefits of a constructivist approach to teaching and learning

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/index_sub6.html

Resources

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/resources.html

And finally - some excellent sites to explore - to increase your curiosity - to learn more about learning more

http://www.exploratorium.edu/evidence/

http://www.exploratorium.edu/explore

Ten cool sites - please explore the subject areas on the left and then dive in!

http://apps.exploratorium.edu/10cool/index.php?cmd=browse&category=16

http://apps.exploratorium.edu/10cool/index.php

Robert L. Fielding